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Posted: Tuesday, December 11th 2012 at 2:41pm

Quinlan expects $5,000 in annual savings thanks to lighting upgrades

By Staff
EMAIL STORY CONTACT EDITOR PRINT
GAINESVILLE - Curbing escalating energy costs has virtually every industry looking to adopt energy-saving practices, and the nonprofit sector is no exception.

At the Quinlan Visual Arts Center in Gainesville, new LED indoor lighting will reduce the environmental impact from energy production and save on the bottom line. Made possible by the Grants to Green partnership and with product support from GE Lighting, Quinlan will pay about $5,000 less a year to illuminate its building, investing these finances instead in new events and exhibitions.

Launched in 2008, Grants to Green gives nonprofits in the Atlanta region the opportunity to renovate or build healthier work places that are energy efficient and provide environmentally focused knowledge. After receiving a facility assessment and recommendations for how to improve efficiency, Quinlan applied for and was awarded an Implementation Grant in the amount of $12,000 to replace more than 200 of the center’s halogen lights with more energy-efficient LED lamps.

After collaborating with GE Lighting to determine ideal product specifications, Quinlan began installing ecomagination PAR38 LED lamps provided by GE in galleries, conference rooms and thoroughfares throughout its 10,000 square-foot facility.

“We count it a privilege to support the creative and lasting contributions of the artists, friends and family of Quinlan,” said John Strainic, general manager of GE Lighting’s Consumer division. “Our hope is that all will enjoy the enhanced color quality and reduced glare our LED lamps lend this already inspired environment.”

Strainic added that installing LED lighting not only enriches patrons’ experience, it helps facility owners reduce energy and maintenance spending. Quinlan Visual Arts Center anticipates total annual savings of about $5,000 following its switch from halogen to LED lighting.

“Thanks to Grants for Green and GE, this one significant change will greatly affect the overall efficiency of our building, not only the energy and heat expelled by the previous lights, but also the considerable staff and volunteer time that was dedicated to maintaining that system,” says Amanda McClure, executive director for Quinlan.

Beyond savings, McClure hopes the receipt of the grant will inspire other Atlanta-area nonprofit organizations to adopt more energy-conscious practices and policies and to share their successes with the clients, partners and communities they serve.

“Once they become aware of the environmental impact and tremendous savings they can achieve, I think many organizations will desire to adopt energy efficient practices, despite limited funds,” she adds.

The founding partners of Grants to Green are The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, providing expertise in grant making, and Southface, providing expertise in energy efficiency. The Quinlan Visual Arts Center applied for an Assessment Award to identify areas of improvement and an Implementation Grant, which allowed the organization to receive funding for specific recommendations.

The new lighting project was unveiled at an opening reception on Thursday, December 6, for “The Six," featuring six contemporary and abstract Georgia artists - Marc West, Kelly Morgenstern, Alan Stecker, David Wendel, Douglas Fromm and Yasharel Manzy, “I-phone Fayum Portrait Recreations” by John Bavaro, “Another Blooming Art Show” florals by Cheri Burchard and Catherine Pichon and a special juried exhibition “The Dog and Pony Show” benefitting Humane Society of Northeast Georgia.
Associated Categories: Local/State News

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