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Posted: Sunday, November 18th 2012 at 9:17am

Obama defends Israel's right to defend itself

By The Associated Press
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President and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra hold a joint press conference at the Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, Sunday. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
BANGKOK (AP) -- President Barack Obama on Sunday defended Israel's airstrikes on the Gaza Strip, but he warned that escalating the offensive with Israeli ground troops could deepen the death toll and undermine any hope of a peace process with the Palestinians.

"Israel has every right to expect that it does not have missiles fired into its territory," Obama said at the start of a three-nation tour in Asia.

"If that can be accomplished without a ramping up of military activity in Gaza, that's preferable," he said. "It's not just preferable for the people of Gaza. It's also preferable for Israelis, because if Israeli troops are in Gaza, they're much more at risk of incurring fatalities or being wounded."

Obama's comments came as Israel's campaign against Hamas militants in Gaza blasted into its fifth day. Israel is at a crossroads of whether to launch a ground invasion or pursue Egyptian-led truce efforts, and Obama sought to clearly defend the U.S. ally's military rights while pushing for a halt in the violence.

From Thailand, Obama also defended his decision to go to Myanmar, also known as Burma. Obama will be the first U.S. president to visit the country, which is moving from a brutal reign toward democracy, but still holds political prisoners and is living with ethnic violence.

"This is not an endorsement of the Burmese government," Obama said. "This is an acknowledgement that there is a process underway inside that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobody foresaw."

Obama said he was also guided by Myanmar's longtime democracy advocate, Aung Sung Suu Kyi, who visited him recently at the White House.

"I'm not somebody who thinks the United States should stand on the sidelines and not get its hands dirty when there's an opportunity for us to encourage the better impulses inside a country," he said.

Change in a country can happen quickly, Obama said, if people believe "their voices are heard."

The president will also visit Cambodia during his Asia trip, which began Sunday in Thailand. He was here as a sign of U.S. commitment to a region his administration deems vital to U.S. economic growth, but the shadows of another Mideast conflict hung over his journey.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared Sunday that Israel was prepared to significantly expand its military operation in Gaza. Obama has been lobbying Netanyahu along with the leaders of Egypt and Turkey to try to halt the crisis - including stopping rocket strikes on Israel.

He said Israel was justly responding to "an ever escalating number of missiles that were landing not just in Israeli territory, but in areas that are populated. And there's no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders."

Obama said Palestinians will have no chance to pursue their own state and a lasting peace with Israel as long as rockets are fired into Israel. He said he hoped for a clearer process over the next 48 hours - showing how much the Mideast conflict had intruded on his diplomatic mission to Asia.

Still, Obama got a red-carpet welcome, a dose of sightseeing and an official dinner of authentic Thai food.

In a news conference with Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, both leaders spoke of deepening ties of trade, security and democracy. Obama's praised Thailand for being a supporter of democracy in Myanmar, the once-pariah state that is rapidly reforming. He said he appreciated the Thai prime minister's insights into Myanmar during their private meeting Sunday.

On a steamy day, Obama began with a visit to the Wat Pho Royal Monastery, a cultural must-see in Bangkok. In stocking feet, the president and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton walked around a golden statue of a sitting Buddha. The complex is a sprawling display of buildings with colorful spires, gardens and waterfalls.

After his time at the temple, Obama paid a courtesy call to the ailing, 84-year-old U.S.-born King Bhumibol Adulyadej in his hospital quarters. The king, the longest serving living monarch, was born in Cambridge, Mass., and studied in Europe.

The centerpiece of the Asia trip comes Monday when Obama travels to Myanmar.

Obama aides see Myanmar as not only a success story but also as a signal to other countries that the U.S. will reward democratic behavior.
Associated Categories: National News, Local/State News

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