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Posted: Wednesday, October 31st 2012 at 8:21am

Obama to visit storm victims as campaign rolls on

By The Associated Press
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WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama put campaign battleground travel on hold to tour the ravaged New Jersey coast Wednesday, while under-the-wire campaigning resumed in swing state Florida that is critical to Republican Mitt Romney's victory plan.

Obama is emphasizing his incumbent's role for a third straight day, skipping voter contact in the handful of states that will decide the election to visit victims of Hurricane Sandy around Atlantic City in a state he's confident of winning. The president's actions have forced Romney to walk a careful line and make tough choices.

The former Massachusetts governor must show respect for the superstorm's casualties all along the Eastern Seaboard. But Romney can ill afford to waste a minute of campaign time, with the contest virtually deadlocked in several key states and the election six days away.

Florida is among the most closely fought and the biggest prize among the swing states with 29 electoral votes. Without victory in Florida, Romney will have an uphill and limited path to electoral victory.

Romney has three stops scheduled across the state with former Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio, while the Obama campaign dispatched Vice President Joe Biden for two stops in the state Wednesday.

GOP running mate Paul Ryan was campaigning across his home state of Wisconsin Wednesday before planning to take his children trick or treating. Wisconsin is part of the Romney-Ryan campaign's eleventh-hour strategy of trying to put Democratic-leaning states in play and forcing Obama to play defense in areas he has expected to win.

After tamping down his partisan tone Tuesday at an Ohio event that chiefly emphasized victims' relief, Romney planned a full-blown return to the trail Wednesday. Sandy largely spared Florida, so Romney calculates he can campaign there without appearing callous.

Obama's revised schedule is a political gamble, too. Rather than use the campaign's final Wednesday to woo voters in tossup states, he will go before cameras with New Jersey's Republican governor, Chris Christie. Christie is one of Romney's most prominent supporters, and a frequent Obama critic. But Christie praised Obama's handling of superstorm Sandy, a political twist the president's visit is sure to underscore.

Obama also took full advantage of incumbency Tuesday. He visited the Red Cross near the White House to commiserate with victims and encourage aid workers. "This is a tough time for millions of people," the president said. "But America is tougher."

While Obama and Romney moved cautiously Tuesday, their campaigns exchanged sharp words in Ohio and expanded their operations into three Democratic-leaning states, a move that will reshape the contest's final six days.

Romney's campaign is running ads in Minnesota and Pennsylvania, and a pro-Romney group is doing the same in Michigan. The three states were considered fairly safe for Obama, but his campaign is taking the threat seriously. It sent former President Bill Clinton to Minnesota on Tuesday and it is buying airtime in all three states.

Republican strategists differ on the Romney campaign's thinking. Some think Romney's aides fear losing all-important Ohio, and they hope for a stunning last-minute breakthrough elsewhere to compensate. Others say the GOP camp has so much money - and so few chances to buy useful airtime in saturated states - that it can spend millions of dollars on a long shot without scrimping in a battleground.

"If they didn't have so much money, they wouldn't be able to do something with so little chance of success," said Democratic strategist Tad Devine.

Another sign that Ohio looms large for the Romney campaign: a guest-filled rally in suburban Cincinnati on Friday to kick off the campaign's final four days. Set to join the GOP ticket are golf legend Jack Nicklaus, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Meanwhile, Democratic groups bitterly complained about a TV ad the Romney camp is running in the Toledo and Youngstown areas of Ohio. The ad suggests that Jeep will move its Toledo car-making facility to China, a claim Jeep executives deny.

Democrats called the ad a brazen lie and a sign of desperation. Even some Republicans worried that Romney has gone too far in a state where voters follow the auto industry closely.
Associated Categories: National News, Politics

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